image Would you believe, trade e-book sales reported to the IPDF rose 87 percent in June compared to the same month a year ago. The June ’08 total for was $4.9 million.

That’s tiny compared to paper books, but it’s a wholesale U.S. figure including just 12-15 publishers, and beyond that, I love the rate of growth. A Kindle effect? And what about the numbers for later in the year? Maybe they’ll receive at least a little boost from Sony’s decision to play up the ePub standard for the Sony Reader.

Now imagine what a kickstart e-books could experience without DRM to gum up a nonproprietary standard like ePub.

Imagine enjoying your best-sellers in E without fearing that a company would go out of business—or otherwise unwittingly wipe out reliable access to  your library.

For other stats, see a nice writeup and analysis from Mark Coker of Smashwords, who says sales for the second quarter rose 43 percent over ’07

Related: Pan Macmillan’s retreat from hated DRM—plus earlier item on the good news.

3 COMMENTS

  1. …more than a little disappointing…

    interested in the post re DRM-free epubs i thought i’d buy one to check…

    download failure followed by 40 mins worth of calls to pan’s customer service; transferred 3 times, cut off twice…

    ended up having to call members of their digital team next monday…

    come on people…this is a tough nut to crack and get joe public buying but let’s make sure the supply chain works!!

  2. What would be interesting to examine would be what definition of book theyr using 12m USD can be from just market research publications that’s now being shipped in PDF when they are ready and not 4 weeks later when they’ve been printed.

    It don’t have to be about epub vs mobi, plain PDF are being sold in speciality markets, and theres safari and similar services that’s also generating revenue.

    What is shows is that there is a increased acceptance towards reading off screens, what I don’t say is what type of content or what type of screens, I mean todays office environment does have lots of text being circulated entirely digital.

The TeleRead community values your civil and thoughtful comments. We use a cache, so expect a delay. Problems? E-mail newteleread@gmail.com.