Kobo appoints Tamblyn President, Chief Content Officer

michale_tamblyn.jpgKobo, now probably Amazon’s biggest rival in the ereader ecosystem realm, with Barnes & Noble wavering over the Nook and an also-ran outside the U.S., has just announced that Michael Tamblyn, hitherto its Chief Content Officer, has now had his position upgraded to the status of President and CCO.

Seen here in an earlier video on TeleRead, Tamblyn is a founding member of Kobo’s team, according to the company, and has “led the expansion of Kobo’s publisher relationships, content catalogue, and merchandising operations” since 2009. His new role will expand the content acquisition and business relationships development he is currently engaged in to push the buildout of the Kobo ereading platform and services as a whole.

“We are entering an exciting time as we continue to evolve Kobo to capture new opportunities in each of the territories in which we operate,” said Tamblyn in the official Kobo release. “We will continue to focus on increasing profitability, growing our market share, succeeding with our incredible partners, and, above all, ensuring we deliver the very best eReading experience to the most passionate readers around the world.”

According to the Kobo materials, Tamblyn also “co-founded Canada’s first online bookstore, purchased by Indigo Books & Music in 1998.”

About Paul St John Mackintosh (1555 Articles)
Paul St John Mackintosh is a British poet, writer of dark fiction, and media pro with a love of e-reading. His gadgets range from a $50 Kindle Fire to his trusty Lenovo cell phone. Paul was educated at public school and Trinity College, Cambridge, but modern technology saved him from the Hugh Grant trap. His acclaimed first poetry collection, The Golden Age, was published in 1997, and reissued on Kindle in 2013, and his second poetry collection, The Musical Box of Wonders, was published in 2011.

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