Neotake.com – an ebook search engine

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Spain may not have the largest ebook publishing industry, but it does have a major ebook search engine – Neotake.  Based in Malaga, this engine, developed by CicloLimite, has social network and price comparison features.

They have indexed over 4,400,000 texts, and, in an email to me by the founder, José Gómez Pérez, say that they are “growing exponentially in scientific texts”.

They’ve just published a metrics report and here is the section on format based on 4,338,762 books:

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Take a look and let us know what you think.  You can find them here.

6 Comments on Neotake.com – an ebook search engine

  1. Inputting two of my books for a search instantly returned… nothing. Despite the fact that they’ve been out a year, available on half a dozen ebook outlets, plus my own books site. So I can’t say much.

  2. You’ll see what he means about scientific texts if you look at the most recently added “books”. They’re actually articles. At a guess, they’ve not really tested that set of additions :).

    It does work, up to a point. I tried searching “Denial of Service” to see if they’d screwed up Steven’s name, and found a load of “scientific texts” tagged as fiction.

    Did you forget to link to the actual post? I found it here –

    http://ciclolimite.com/2011/03/30/neotake-com-metrics-report-march-2011/

    The interesting bit is that 90% of them are free… ahh. Got it. They’re including Internet Archive scans.

    I figure Google can get some value out of that sort of thing because they know what they’re doing, they theoretically offer a service (full text search), and they have RECAPTCHA proofreading 30 million words per day. If anyone else flood-fills their database with a million old texts readable only on tablets and PCs, I wonder what they’re thinking.

  3. The breakdown by format makes me feel good about the choice of formats in which I offer my books: PDF, EPUB and MOBI (which can also be read on Kindle) accounts for roughly 90% of the market. The addition of RTF means consumers can manually convert to the other 10% of formats as needed (and those who have problems converting for themselves can still get my books in other formats from Smashwords). In a market with so many formats, I think that’s good coverage.

    Not that consumers will find my books through these guys…

  4. My book shows up, but at last year’s price. It seems like a great start to a useful tool though.

  5. It also points to an illegal audiobook download site for a favorite author of mine, so I’m not sure how cautious they’re being.

  6. oops- can my previous comment be deleted? it was taken from a discussion of ebook search engines, and I hadn’t noticed that the subject had changed to a different engine than this one – to the best of my knowledge, this one doesn’t point to illegal sites.

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